Nako & Tabo

Nako & Tabo

Each village I have been to in the last few days of traveling has consistently been the smallest village I have ever been to. Nako has about 800 residents and Tabo is right around there as well. Despite two more road blocks from landslides on the second most dangerous road the world after all and getting a rough case of altitude sickness we made it to Nako in 10 hours. Sure it was only supposed to take 5 but its India and it doesn’t always help to ask why. So even though I spent half of the time here in bed there was of course still time to take a few strolls around the village, see some smiling faces, eat Israeli food with Israeli friends and of course do my damnedest to capture a bit of the beauty of this charming hillside village.
During a vicious battle with altitude sickness I was able to take in this view, i think it made it feel better, for a second or two.

During a vicious battle with altitude sickness I was able to take in this view, i think it made it feel better, for a second or two.

Eating shakshuka with Israeli's was fun but the real Dr Shakshuka in TelAviv, it may now be on my list of places to visit.

Eating shaksuka with Israeli’s was fun but the real Dr Shaksuka in TelAviv, it may now be on my list of places to visit.

Tabo was the last stop before reaching Kaza, and each day I became a little more excited to arrive at what I am now calling my new home. When your not used to spending more than a week in one place the idea of spending the next few months settled down somewhere seems like a big deal. Tabo was quite and we stayed at the Monestary’s guesthouse (the monastery was built in 996 but the guesthouse was at least slightly newer. Each morning we got up at 5:30 to sit with the monks while their ritual chants/prayers. They gave us Chai and the time spent meditating was all but the most time meaningful time of the last month and a half. No cameras allowed, bummer.
Although similar in its serenity, this little place with a drastically different landscape from Chitkal. No more pines, or cedars, just some apple trees that had been purposefully planted where they could thrive off the river water that was diverted uphill. The mountains were bare, this is a desert.
These are the stairs leading up to the side entrance of the Monastery that took us in for the nigh, it was built in 996 so it was kinda old.

These are the stairs leading up to the side entrance of the Monastery that took us in for the nigh, it was built in 996 so it was kinda old.

As I walked down from the caves used by monks to meditate the view was to good to leave my camera at my side.

As I walked down from the caves used by monks to meditate the view was to good to leave my camera at my side.

2 Comments

  1. Michael Silvano · July 28, 2014

    Vinny… These photos are insane! I am constantly checking this site for new updates. It looks like you are having an absolutely amazing journey. You have inspired me to start my own journey next summer. Keep at it!

    -Mike

  2. Erica · July 29, 2014

    Wow this post is amazing I think the second image you took (during your altitude sickness) is one of my favorite photos you’ve taken to date. Nice work.

Leave a Reply